Coaching skills based on body image research, and sports promotion activities based on them

2013-0130-10
researcher's name
about researcher KANOSUE, Kazuyuki Professor
affiliation
Faculty of Sport Sciences School of Sport and Sciences
research field
Sports science,Environmental physiology (including physical medicine and nutritional physiology),Neurophysiology/General neuroscience
keyword

background

Improving sports motor skills is not a simple matter of strengthening muscles. The series of motor control processes, during the course of a signal being sent out from the higher brain and reaching the muscle to move it, are corrected in order to create a new movement. Scientific analysis of this method of acquiring new moves will offer suggestions for coaching methods that are customized to the needs of individuals, and contribute to management of disabilities, supervision of conditioning and improvements in the sport.

summary

We are measuring and analyzing brain activity during “body imaging” in which people recall movements without actual physical movement, and the gap between what people consider to be the ideal movement and reality. Noninvasive brain imaging and biomechanical measurements are carried out specifically on somersaults and kicking motions, motions that involve cutaneous sensations, and movements using tools.

application/development

Proposing training and coaching methods in accordance with motor ability.
Promoting life-long involvement in sports targeting children and the elderly, and collaborating in initiatives with fitness clubs and local communities.

predominance

Potential to offer proposals for methods that do not rely on simple repetitive training, but are effective and allow the greater enjoyment of sports.

purpose of providing seeds

Sponsord research, Collaboration research, Technical consultation

remarks

Reader, Sports Sciences for the Promotion of Active Life, GCOE Program

material

  • Fig. 1 (left): The amplitude of motor-evoked potential during the imaging of motion is bigger than when in a resting state, as recorded by an electromyogram Fig. 2 (right): Brain activity during the imaging of motion
  • Fig. 3: A somersault (difficult for inexperienced people to do)

same researcher's seeds

  • Analyzing sports skills
posted: 2014/05/21